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The deadly attacks that ripped through Brussels' airport and a metro station on March 22 killed 32 people, according to Belgian Minister of Social Affairs and Health Maggie De Block.

Including three dead attackers, the total number of dead stands at 35. More than 300 people were injured in the blasts.

Some of the families whose relatives went missing last Tuesday after the suicide bombings in Brussels still don't know the fate of their loved ones.

Belgian volunteers assigned to help those families say with each day that passes, it becomes more difficult for them. They teeter between hope and despair and can't grieve or find closure, says Red Cross psychosocial worker Anne-Claire Henry. "They need answers, but at the moment all they have are questions — 'where is my husband, my wife, my sister?'"

Bernie Sanders swept all three Democratic caucuses that were held on Saturday, according to the Associated Press.

He took each state by a striking margin. In Washington state — the biggest prize for Sanders, where 101 pledged delegates were up for grabs — Sanders won with 73 percent of the vote.

In Alaska, with 16 pledged delegates were at stake, Sanders won with 82 percent; and in Hawaii, with 25 delegates, the senator from Vermont won with 70 percent.

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The Obama administration insists the Islamic State is not an Islamic state, but the Pentagon says it has achieved success against the terror group by treating it like one.

American leaders from President Obama on down reject the Islamic State's core claim of being a "caliphate," a self-proclaimed Islamic nation that stretches from Syria to Iraq.

Carolyn Rossi has been a registered nurse for 27 years, and she's been fiercely protective of infants in her intensive care unit — babies born too soon, babies born with physical and cognitive abnormalities and, increasingly, babies born dependent on opioids.

On a terrace outside his Havana apartment, Eduardo Martinez nurtures a small schefflera tree. On a Friday afternoon in January, he looks up at its leaves fondly.

"I got it when I was in the sanitarium. I put it in my living room and it began to grow until it reached the ceiling," he says in Spanish through a translator.

When he left the sanitarium in 1996, he took a clipping from the plant. "It was so small," he says. "But it has turned into this forest that you have here — so this is a memento from that time."

The Rolling Stones Rock Cuba

Mar 26, 2016

Historians hailed U.S. President Obama's visit to Cuba as the beginning of a new relationship between the two countries. But for hundreds of thousands of Cubans, the real thrill this week was the visit of some prominent Brits: The Rolling Stones.

Two men have been charged with crimes related to terrorism in connection with Tuesday's attacks on Brussels. Meanwhile, a march planned to commemorate the attack and express national unity has been canceled because of security concerns.

The attacks, which killed 31 and wounded more than 300, struck Brussels Airport and a metro station in the city. The suicide bombings have been claimed by the Islamic State.

The men charged Saturday were arrested during a series of sweeps and raids conducted by Belgian authorities on Thursday and Friday.

A Navy captain has been sentenced to nearly four years in prison for his involvement in a bribery scandal.

Capt. Daniel Dusek, the former deputy director of operations for the Navy's 7th Fleet, pleaded guilty last year to conspiracy to commit bribery, admitting he traded classified information for luxury gifts and access to prostitutes. He was sentenced to 46 months on Friday.

John B. King Jr was recently confirmed by the Senate as the new U.S. Secretary of Education for the remainder of President Obama's term, succeeding Arne Duncan.

With a slew of pressing issues from pre-K to college debt, I wanted to find out what King thinks he can get done in such a short window of time. Here's our conversation.

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Those of you working on your golf swing may hear this.

(SOUNDBITE OF GOLF SWING)

SIMON: But Jonathan Berger hears this.

(SOUNDBITE OF VOCALIZATION)

COMPUTERIZED VOICE: (Singing) La...

Is March Losing Its Madness?

Mar 26, 2016

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You know what I missed when I was away for a few weeks? The chance to say time for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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There's a clip of a Hillary Clinton interview making the rounds on the Internet. Let's hear.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED BROADCAST)

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Alaskans Band Together For Remote Caucuses

Mar 26, 2016

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Brussels Demonstrators March In Solidarity

Mar 26, 2016

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Former NBA star and current basketball broadcaster Bill Walton was once at a point in his life where he considered suicide after a debilitating back injury.

He speaks with NPR's Scott Simon about his injury, his ultimate recovery, tidbits from his time playing for UCLA and legendary coach John Wooden, and even talks a bit about the Grateful Dead and why some lyrics have special meaning.

Listen to the interview in the audio player above.

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Donald Trump has said on several occasions that he wants to, as he puts it, "open up" libel laws, so that he can sue news organizations he believes have written what he calls "hit pieces."

Libel laws now make it extremely difficult for public figures to sue for damages. Still, a President Trump would very likely have a hard time changing them.

In recent years, Turkey has been criticized for doing too little to stop jihadi fighters from moving between the Mideast and Europe. Its more than 500-mile border with Syria has come in for particular scrutiny throughout the five-year Syrian conflict.

But Turkey says it has deported thousands of suspected foreign fighters or Islamic State supporters since 2011 — nearly 3,300 of them, according to a recent estimate. Many came originally from Europe.

This is what a campaign in the gutter looks like.

Once again, the political world is talking about a National Enquirer story.

The last time was during the 2008 presidential campaign when the tabloid alleged that Democratic presidential candidate John Edwards had fathered a child out of wedlock. When the rumor first surfaced, the media largely ignored it.

It turned out to be true.

In a gruesome, long-standing Good Friday ritual in the Philippines, a man was nailed to a cross as part of the re-enactment of Jesus Christ's death. It was this particular follower's 30th time being crucified.

The Nigerian army claims to have rescued more than 800 hostages from Boko Haram, the militant group that has held major swathes of territory in the country.

NPR's Gregory Warner tells our Newscast Unit that it "was not immediately clear whether the rescues included any of the 200 schoolgirls kidnapped nearly two years ago [who inspired] the #BringBackOurGirls movement." Here's more from Gregory:

The world is in danger of running out of vaccines for a deadly disease: yellow fever. A major outbreak in the African nation of Angola has already depleted the stockpile that world health officials had set aside for emergencies. It's unclear whether new vaccines can be made in time — even as officials worry that the epidemic could spread through Asia and beyond.

Japanese Fleet Kills 333 Whales In The Antarctic

Mar 25, 2016

Japan's whaling fleet has returned to base with the carcasses of 333 minke whales, in apparent violation of a ruling by the International Court of Justice.

Reuters quoted a statement by Japan's Fisheries Agency that said 103 male and 230 female whales were caught during the fleet's summer expedition to Antarctic waters. Ninety percent of the mature females were pregnant.

With Major League Baseball's opening day just a little more than a week away, teams from across the nation are in training camps, busy preparing for the start of the 2016 season.

But not too busy to cuddle with some baby bears.

On Friday, the Chicago Cubs brought two tiny bear cubs to training camp in Mesa, Ariz. Fuzzy fun ensued.

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